Multipix Imaging

Machine Vision Lighting

Without good lighting your vision system will never see anything!! Therefore identifying the correct lighting technique to use within an inspection solution is vital to the success on the solution. Multipix have trained staff that are experts in this field. Multipix not only have a wealth of knowledge but a huge array of lighting at our disposal. Including ranges from, Moritex, Spectrum Illumination, ProPhotonix, DCM, IMAC and Computar.


Traditional Lighting Schemes…

    Ring Light

Versatile and common lighting solution. Available as
direct or indirect and with low angle options for
illuminating defects on shiny surfaces.
View our full range of Ring Lights…

 

 

 

Back Light

Delivers broad, high-quality diffused light, providing
sharp contrast to outline the shape of a component and
view openings such as drilled holes.
View our full range of Back Lights…

 

 

 

Dome Light

Provides practical and cost effective solutions illuminating
the surface of an object uniformly by reflecting 360 degrees
of light. Ideal for shiny or bumpy surfaces.
View our full range of Dome Lights…

 

 

 

Darkfield Light

Provides 360-degree illumination from a shallow angle
to ensure that the LEDs are not reflected even on shiny
surfaces. Dramatically enhances the contrast of surface
features such as laser-embossed, engraved marks or
surface defects.
View our full range of Darkfield Lights…

 

 

 

Coaxial Light

Provides diffused, uniform illumination for flat specular
surfaces. Can be a separate unit or integrated in suitable
lenses to offer illumination within the cameras optical path.
Ideal for imaging reflective surfaces, including wafers,
metal surfaces, film, liquid crystal and glass.
View our full range of Coaxial Lights…

 

 

 

Line Light

Ideal for linescan camera applications where very intense
and uniform illumination is required over a wide field of view.
View our full range of Line Lights…


Beyond traditional methods there are many special lighting techniques

 

For example, the IMAC Magic Dome, a single dome light without a camera hole to enable simultaneous images with multiple cameras. Ideal for inspection of inner surfaces of bottle caps and similar applications, giving a 180 degree view.

 

 

 

Another would be Infra-Red illumination: IR lighting can be used to ‘eliminate’ colour information. Or create high contrast especially for items that are difficult to view in visible light. Check out our video to see this effect in action!

 

 

 

Or Polarising, using a Polarised light can eliminate unwanted reflections. For example, in this video you will see all glare from this shiny foil lid is eliminated and the best before date can be seen with ease. Check out our video to see this effect in action!

 

Check out our full range of lighting products here!

Can’t find what you are look for? Then call our experts on 01730 233332.


Lasers

Lasers are another source of illumination that is often over-looked.

They are typically used for alignment and 3D profiling but can also be used as a source of monochromatic light.

Check out this video where the laser line is being used to enable 3D profiling in combination with a SmartRay 3D camera.

Colour & Contrast

Why is colour so important to illumination?

The Electromagnetic Spectrum is the entire range of electromagnetic wavelengths or put another way, it is the entire range of light seen and unseen!

Humans associate daily with a very small section of this range, the ‘visible band’.

  • Although the majority of machine vision applications are in the visible band of light, many are also using X-ray, UltraViolet and Infra-Red.
  • The types of radiation that occur in different parts of the spectrum have different uses and dangers
  • The sensor used in a camera will determine how responsive it is at a particular wavelength
  • IR has a large wavelength that is visible and can transmit further into certain material such as semi-conductors, paper and other organic materials.

Use colour to create more contrast

Using the light spectrum opposite will make a feature appear darker. Using the same light spectrum will make a part feature appear lighter.

  • If the part feature you want to make darker is red, use a green light
  • Use a green light to make a green feature appear lighter

This technique is commonly used to make image processing more robust and reliable.


Video

  • Moritex
  • FingerLake Instruments
  • Imperx
  • Kowa
  • Euresys
  • Basler